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When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit

When Hitler Stole Pink Rabbit
 

Partly autobiographical, this is first of the trilogy by Judith Kerr telling the story of a Jewish family fleeing from Germany at the start of the Second World War

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Quick Reference

ISBN 9780001912717
Published 20 February 1989 by HarperCollins Publishers
Format Paperback, New edition
Alternate Format(s) View All (11 other possible title(s) available)
Author(s) By Kerr, Judith
Availability Out of print

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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780001912717
ISBN-10 0001912712
Stock Out of stock
Status Out of print
Publisher HarperCollins Publishers
Imprint Collins
Publication Date 20 February 1989
Publication Country United Kingdom United Kingdom
Format Paperback, New edition
Edition New edition
Author(s) By Kerr, Judith
Category Fiction (Child / Teen)
Number of Pages 192
Dimensions Width: 118mm
Height: 185mm
Weight 208g
Interest Age Children
Reading Age Children
Library of Congress Jewish families, Germany, History, 20th century, Juvenile fiction
NBS Text Children's Fiction
ONIX Text Children/juvenile
Dewey Code 823.914
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

Partly autobiographical, this is first of the trilogy by Judith Kerr telling the story of a Jewish family fleeing from Germany at the start of the Second World War

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

US Review Among Hitler's other crimes, he stole Anna's pink rabbit (when he confiscated all of her Jewish family's property) and made her a refugee at the age of ten - moving from Berlin to Switzerland, France and England in search of a new home. While she only vaguely comprehends the events that worry her parents so much (wondering what it means when people say that Hitler will get the Jews and that her father has a price on his head ), Anna writes poems about disasters and suffers from nightmares. Most of the time, however, she is absorbed by the minor difficulties of adjusting to expatriation - the awkward attentions of Swiss boys, struggles with the French language, brother Max's effortless adaptabilty - and the adventure of newfound poverty. The title, though initially disconcerting, really says it all: the repercussions of Nazism seen through a child's personalizing perspective and recalled with autobiographical verity. (Kirkus Reviews)

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Author's Bio

There is no author biography for this title.

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