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Legislating International Organization: The US Congress, the IMF, and the World Bank

Legislating International Organization: The US Congress, the IMF, and the World Bank
 

In Legislating International Organization, Kathryn Lavelle argues against the commonly-held idea that key international organizations are entities unto themselves, immune from the influence and pressures of individual states' domestic policies.

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Quick Reference

ISBN 9780199765348
Barcode 9780199765348
Published 15 December 2011 by Oxford University Press (S3)
Format Hardback
Author(s) By Lavelle, Kathryn C.
Availability Indent title (sourced internationally), usually ships 4-6 weeks post release/order

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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780199765348
ISBN-10 0199765340
Stock Available
Status Indent title (sourced internationally), usually ships 4-6 weeks post release/order
Publisher Oxford University Press (S3)
Imprint Oxford University Press Inc
Publication Date 15 December 2011
International Publication Date 3 November 2011
Publication Country United States United States
Format Hardback
Author(s) By Lavelle, Kathryn C.
Category Central Government
International Relations
International Law Of Territories
Banking Law
Number of Pages 272
Dimensions Width: 163mm
Height: 241mm
Spine: 37mm
Weight 508g
Interest Age General Audience
Reading Age General Audience
Library of Congress United States, Monetary policy, World Bank, International Monetary Fund
NBS Text International Law: Professional
ONIX Text Professional and scholarly
Dewey Code 346.08215
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

In Legislating International Organization, Kathryn Lavelle argues against the commonly-held idea that key international organizations are entities unto themselves, immune from the influence and pressures of individual states' domestic policies. Covering the history of the IMF and World Bank from their origins, she shows that domestic political constituencies in advanced industrial states have always been important drivers of international financial institution policy. Lavelle focuses in particular on the U.S. Congress, tracing its long history of involvement with these institutions and showing how it wields significant influence. Drawing from archival research and interviews with members and staff, Lavelle shows that Congress is not particularly hostile to the multilateralism inherent in the IMF and World Bank, and has championed them at several key historical junctures. Congress is not uniformly supportive of these institutions, however. As Lavelle illustrates, it is more defensive of its constitutionally designated powers and more open to competing interest group concerns than legislatures in other advanced industrial states. Legislating International Organization will reshape how we think about how the U.S. Congress interacts with international institutions and more broadly about the relationship of domestic politics to global governance throughout the world. This is especially relevant given the impact of 2008 financial crisis, which has made the issue of multilateralism in American politics more important than ever.

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

NZ Review <br> An important book...Lavelle succeeds handily at documenting the politics of funding the world's most important public financial institutions from inside the legislature of the world's most powerful country. It is a 'must read' for anyone interested in understanding Congress's role in shaping the activities and agendas of the IMF and the World Bank. --The Review of International Organizations <br><p><br>

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Author's Bio

Kathryn C. Lavelle is Associate Professor of Political Science at Case Western Reserve University, and author of The Politics of Equity Finance in Emerging Markets (OUP 2004)

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