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Inherit the Alamo: Myth and Ritual at an American Shrine
  

Inherit the Alamo: Myth and Ritual at an American Shrine (Trade Paperback / Paperback)

By Brear, Holly Beachley

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Long overshadowed by the towering buildings of downtown San Antonio, the modest little Alamo evokes tremendous feeling among Texans and, indeed, many other Americans. This book explores what the Alamo means to the numerous groups that lay claim to its heritage.

ISBN 9780292718746
Barcode 9780292718746
Published 1 January 1994 by Inbooks
Format Trade Paperback/Paperback
Alternate Format(s) View All (1 other possible title(s) available)
Availability
Internationally sourced; usually ships 2-3 weeks

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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780292718746
ISBN-10 0292718748
Stock Available
Status Internationally sourced; usually ships 2-3 weeks
Publisher Inbooks
Imprint University of Texas Press
Publication Date 1 January 1994
Publication Country United States United States
Format Trade Paperback/Paperback
Author(s) By Brear, Holly Beachley
Category Area / Regional Studies
American History
Social & Cultural Anthropology
Number of Pages 192
Dimensions Width: 152mm
Height: 229mm
Spine: 11mm
Weight 624g
Interest Age General Audience
Reading Age General Audience
Library of Congress Alamo (San Antonio, Tex.) - Folklore, Alamo (San Antonio, Tex.) - History
NBS Text Sociology & Anthropology: Professional
ONIX Text Professional and scholarly
Dewey Code 398.09764351
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

Long overshadowed by the towering buildings of downtown San Antonio, the modest little Alamo still evokes tremendous feeling among Texans and, indeed, many other Americans. For Anglo Texans, the Alamo is the 'Cradle of Texas Liberty' and a symbolic confirmation of Manifest Destiny. For Hispanic Texans, however, the Alamo has increasingly become a stolen symbol, its origin as a Spanish mission forgotten, its famous defeat used to exclude Hispanics from an honorable place in Texas history. In this important new book, Holly Beachley Brear explores in fascinating detail what the Alamo means to the numerous groups that lay claim to its heritage. She shows how Alamo myths often diverge from the historical facts - and why.She decodes the agendas of various groups, including the Daughters of the Republic of Texas (who maintain the Alamo buildings and grounds), the Order of the Alamo, the Texas Cavaliers, and LULAC. And she probes attempts by individuals and groups to rewrite the Alamo myth to include more positive roles for themselves, as she explains the value in laying claim to the Alamo's past. With new perspectives on all the sacred icons of the Alamo and the Fiesta that celebrates (one version of) its history each year, Inherit the Alamo is guaranteed to challenge stereotypes and offer new understanding of the Alamo's ongoing role in shaping Texas and American history and mythology. It will be of interest to a wide popular and scholarly audience. Born in San Antonio, Texas, Holly Beachley Brear holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Virginia. She currently resides in Culpeper, Virginia, and teaches with the PAGE program at George Mason University.

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

NZ Review This provocative book is must reading for anyone who has ever wondered why all hell frequently breaks loose over the interpretation of events at places like the Alamo or Little Big Horn. Books of the Southwest Astonishingly enough, [Brear] probably understates the bizarre intersection of class structures, ethnicities, heritage icons, mythmaking, secret societies, and politics which meets at the Alamo... Inherit the Alamo successfully investigates the use and abuse of a cultural icon in its migration from a relatively obscure historical event to a centerpiece of ongoing discussions related to birthrights, inclusiveness, and social control. Locus ... the Alamo as a contemporary shrine of American culture has not been examined in this approach or depth... The result is a chronicle of 'use' of the Alamo, and 'ownership' of its history, that makes me gasp when I see it described. I think most Texans will gasp, too. James Wright Steely, Director, National Register Programs, Texas Historical Commission

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Author's Bio

Born in San Antonio, Texas, Holly Beachley Brear holds a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Virginia.

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