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The Ethics of Eating Animals: Usually Bad, Sometimes Wrong, Often Permissible

The Ethics of Eating Animals: Usually Bad, Sometimes Wrong, Often Permissible (Hardback)

By Fischer, Bob

  • RRP: $271.00
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Intensive animal agriculture wrongs many, many animals. Philosophers have argued, on this basis, that most people in wealthy Western contexts are morally obligated to avoid animal products. This book explains why the author thinks that's mistaken. He reaches this negative conclus... read full description below.

ISBN 9780367230043
Barcode 9780367230043
Published 30 July 2019 by Taylor & Francis Ltd
Format Hardback
Series Routledge Research in Applied Ethics
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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780367230043
ISBN-10 0367230046
Stock Available
Status Pre-order title, release date has been delayed
Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
Imprint Routledge
Publication Date 30 July 2019
International Release Date 1 November 2019
Publication Country United Kingdom United Kingdom
Format Hardback
Author(s) By Fischer, Bob
Series Routledge Research in Applied Ethics
Category Cultural Studies
Ethics & Moral Philosophy
Ethical Issues & Debates
Animals & Society
Agriculture & Related Industries
Number of Pages 192
Dimensions Width: 152mm
Height: 229mm
Weight 535g
Interest Age 19+ years
Reading Age 19+ years
Library of Congress Animal welfare - Moral and ethical aspects, Vegetarianism - Moral and ethical aspects, Veganism - Moral and ethical aspects, Veganism - Moral and ethical aspects
NBS Text Philosophy
ONIX Text College/higher education
Dewey Code 178
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

Intensive animal agriculture wrongs many, many animals. Philosophers have argued, on this basis, that most people in wealthy Western contexts are morally obligated to avoid animal products. This book explains why the author thinks that's mistaken. He reaches this negative conclusion by contending that the major arguments for veganism fail: they don't establish the right sort of connection between producing and eating animal-based foods. Moreover, if they didn't have this problem, then they would have other ones: we wouldn't be obliged to abstain from all animal products, but to eat strange things instead-e.g., roadkill, insects, and things left in dumpsters. On his view, although we have a collective obligation not to farm animals, there is no specific diet that most individuals ought to have. Nevertheless, he does think that some people are obligated to be vegans, but that's because they've joined a movement, or formed a practical identity, that requires that sacrifice. This book argues that there are good reasons to make such a move, albeit not ones strong enough to show that everyone must do likewise.

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

NZ Review This is one of the most honest books I've ever read. Rather than grinding an axe, Fischer follows the reasons to the conclusions they support-conclusions at odds with what he had hoped to establish. - Donald Bruckner, Penn State University, New Kensington, USA

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Author's Bio

Bob Fischer teaches philosophy at Texas State University. He's the author of Animal Ethics - A Contemporary Introduction (Routledge, forthcoming) and the editor of The Moral Complexities of Eating Meat (2015) and The Routledge Handbook of Animal Ethics (Routledge, forthcoming).

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