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Facing My Lai: Moving Beyond the Massacre

Facing My Lai: Moving Beyond the Massacre
 

The My Lai massacre of March 16, 1968, and the court martial of Lt. William Calley a year and a half later are among the bleakest episodes of the Vietnam War. This work examines its haunting legacy through an exchange of contemporary viewpoints.

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Quick Reference

ISBN 9780700610570
Barcode 9780700610570
Published 28 February 1998 by Inbooks
Format Paperback, New title
Author(s) Edited by Anderson, David L.
Series Modern War Studies
Availability Out of print

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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780700610570
ISBN-10 070061057X
Stock Out of stock
Status Out of print
Publisher Inbooks
Imprint University Press of Kansas
Publication Date 28 February 1998
Publication Country United States United States
Format Paperback, New title
Edition New title
Author(s) Edited by Anderson, David L.
Series Modern War Studies
Category Asian / Middle Eastern History
Asian history: Vietnam War
American History
American history: Vietnam War
Military History
Battles & Campaigns
War Crimes
Number of Pages 244
Dimensions Width: 156mm
Height: 235mm
Spine: 14mm
Weight 318g
Interest Age General Audience
Reading Age General Audience
Library of Congress My Lai Massacre, Vietnam, 1968, Vietnam War, 1961-1975 - Atrocities, My Lai Massacre, Vietnam, 1968
NBS Text Military History
ONIX Text General/trade;College/higher education;Professional and scholarly
Dewey Code 959.704342
Catalogue Code 919825

Description of this Book

The My Lai massacre of March 16, 1968, and the court martial of Lt. William Calley a year and a half later are among the bleakest episodes in American history and continue to provide a volatile focus for debates about the Vietnam War. Other books have exposed the facts surrounding the incident; Facing My Lai now examines its haunting legacy through an exchange of contemporary viewpoints. This powerful book presents a stellar gathering of writers, including journalists Seymour Hersh and David Halberstam, novelist Tim O'Brien, historian Stephen E. Ambrose, psychiatrist Robert Jay Lifton, military prosecutor William Eckhardt, and the two true heroes in the My Lai story - Hugh Thompson and the late Ron Ridenhour. As these authors show, the US is still trying to come to grips with its bitter experience in Vietnam. A grim window into the darker side of American history, Facing My Lai reminds us of humanity's baffling capacity for atrocity within the crucible of war as well as its urgent need for healing in the face of such violence.

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

NZ Review A profound memorial to a dark, forgotten history. A book of utmost importance. --<b>Oliver Stone</b> A coherent volume of passionate reflections on the painful subject of the My Lai massacre. --<b>Marilyn B. Young</b>, author of <i>The Vietnam Wars, 1945-1990</i> I read this book with great interest and deep emotion. I expect it will have a deeply cathartic effect on its readers. The recollections of those who had a hand in uncovering My Lai's horrible truth are gripping, and the discussion of post-traumatic stress disorder adds a whole new dimension to the story. --<b>Robert D. Schulzinger</b>, author of <i>A Time for War</i>
US Review An all-encompassing, multidimensional examination of the 1968 My Lai massacre by a distinguished group of historians, military men, journalists, poets, and novelists. Most compilations of academic conference papers are dry affairs filled with essays written in yawn-Inducing academese. Facing My Lai, on the other hand, is made up primarily of reader-friendly transcripts of remarks made at roundtable discussions that were held at a three-day Tulane University conference in December 1994, 25 years after the infamous massacre. Anderson (History and Political Science/Univ. of Indianapolis) has edited judiciously and chosen wisely from the words of the accomplished conferees. The participants included journalists David Halberstam and Seymour Hersh, poets John Balaban and W.D. Ehrhart, historians George Herring and Stephen Ambrose, military strategy analyst Col. Harry Summers, and psychiatrist Robert J. Lifton. Also on hand were two Vietnam veterans who acted honorably and courageously in connection with My Lai: Hugh Thompson Jr., a former helicopter pilot who rescued Vietnamese civilians during the massacre, and Ron Ridenhour, a former infantryman who learned of the massacre and did not rest until the story was made public. The book's highlights include Thompson's emotionally wrenching firsthand testimony; Herfing's illuminating essay on the reasons why the Vietnam War was different from other American wars; Summers's thoughtful comments on leadership in the military; Patience Mason's adroit mix of personal and professional reflections on post-traumatic stress disorder; and conference co-organizer Randy Fertel's summarizing essay on the conference's goals and accomplishments. One theme was the debate over whether My Lai was an aberration. Most conferees argued that the massacre was not, as Herring put it, typical in any sense. But others disagreed, seeing My Lai as symptomatic of how the war was prosecuted by the US. Thoughtful and thought-provoking ideas on a still-controversial topic. (Kirkus Reviews)

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Author's Bio

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