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Agency: Its Role In Mental Development
 

Agency: Its Role In Mental Development (Hardback)

By Russell, James

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The idea behind this book is that developing a conception of the physical world and a conception of mind is impossible without the exercise of agency.

ISBN 9780863772283
Barcode 9780863772283
Published 31 January 1996 by Taylor & Francis Ltd
Format Hardback
Series Essays in Developmental Psychology
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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9780863772283
ISBN-10 0863772285
Stock Available
Status Indent title (sourced internationally), usually ships 4-6 weeks post release/order
Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
Imprint Psychology Press Ltd
Publication Date 31 January 1996
Publication Country United Kingdom United Kingdom
Format Hardback
Author(s) By Russell, James
Series Essays in Developmental Psychology
Category Social & Cultural History
Ethnic Studies
Anthropology
Public Health & Preventive Medicine
Number of Pages 336
Dimensions Width: 159mm
Height: 235mm
Spine: 26mm
Weight 612g
Interest Age 19+ years
Reading Age 19+ years
Library of Congress Cognition in children, Developmental psychology, Agent Philosophy, Cognition, Child
NBS Text History: Specific Subjects
ONIX Text College/higher education;Professional and scholarly
Dewey Code 306.46108693
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

The idea behind this book is that developing a conception of the physical world and a conception of mind is impossible without the exercise of agency, meaning the power to alter at will one's perceptual inputs . The thesis is derived from a philosphical account of the role of agency in knowledge. The book is divided into three parts. In Part One, the author argues that purely representational theories of mind and of mental development have been overvalued, thereby clearing the ground for the book's central thesis. In Part Two, he proposes that, because objective experience depends upon the experience of agency, the development of the object concept in human infants is grounded in the development of executive-attentional capacities. In Part Three, an analysis of the links between agency and self-awareness generates an original theory of the nature of certain stage-like transitions in mental functioning and of the relationship between executive and mentalizing defects in autism. The book should be of interest to students and researchers in cognitive-developmental psychology, to philosophers of mind, and to anybody with an interest in cognitive science.

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