Wheelers Books
Social Order/Mental Disorder: Anglo-American Psychiatry in Historical Perspective

Social Order/Mental Disorder: Anglo-American Psychiatry in Historical Perspective (Hardback)

By Scull, Andrew

  • RRP: $233.00
  • $233.00
  • In Stock At Publisher

Social Order/Mental Disorder represents a provocative and exciting exploration of social response to madness in England and the United States from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. Scull, who is well-known for his previous work in this area, examines a range of issu... read full description below.

ISBN 9781138315891
Barcode 9781138315891
Published 17 October 2018 by Taylor & Francis Ltd
Format Hardback
Alternate Format(s) View All (3 other possible title(s) available)
Series Routledge Library Editions: Psychiatry (part: 21)
Availability
In stock at publisher; ships 6-12 working days

... view full title details below.

Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9781138315891
ISBN-10 1138315893
Stock Available
Status In stock at publisher; ships 6-12 working days
Publisher Taylor & Francis Ltd
Imprint Routledge
Publication Date 17 October 2018
International Publication Date 18 September 2018
Publication Country United Kingdom United Kingdom
Format Hardback
Author(s) By Scull, Andrew
Series Routledge Library Editions: Psychiatry (part: 21)
Category Social & Cultural History
Disability: Social Aspects
History Of Medicine
Psychiatry
Number of Pages 370
Dimensions Width: 159mm
Height: 235mm
Weight 848g
Interest Age General Audience
Reading Age General Audience
Library of Congress Mental illness - Social aspects - History - Great Britain, Mental illness - Social aspects - History - United States, Psychiatry - History - Great Britain, Psychiatry - History - United States, Mental illness - Philosophy
NBS Text Psychiatry & Clinical Psychology: Professional
ONIX Text College/higher education;Professional and scholarly;General/trade
Dewey Code 362.20941
Catalogue Code Not specified

Description of this Book

Social Order/Mental Disorder represents a provocative and exciting exploration of social response to madness in England and the United States from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. Scull, who is well-known for his previous work in this area, examines a range of issues, including the changing social meanings of madness, the emergence and consolidation of the psychiatric profession, the often troubled relationship between psychiatry and the law, the linkages between sex and madness, and the constitution, character, and collapse of the asylum as our standard response to the problems posed by mental disorder. This book is emphatically not part of the venerable tradition of hagiography that has celebrated psychiatric history as a long struggle in which the steady application of rational-scientific principles has produced irregular but unmistakable evidence of progress toward humane treatments for the mentally ill. In fact, Scull contends that traditional mental hospitals, for much of their existence, resembled cemeteries for the still breathing, medical hubris having at times served to license dangerous, mutilating, even life-threatening experiments on the dead souls confined therein. He argues that only the sociologically blind would deny that psychiatrists are deeply involved in the definition and identification of what constitutes madness in our world - hence, claims that mental illness is a purely naturalistic category, somehow devoid of contamination by the social, are taken to be patently absurd. Scull points out, however, that the commitment to examine psychiatry and its ministrations with a critical eye by no means entails the romantic idea that the problems it deals with are purely the invention of the professional mind, or the Manichean notion that all psychiatric interventions are malevolent and ill-conceived. It is the task of unromantic criticism that is attempted in this book.

^ top

Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

There are no reviews for this title.

^ top

Author's Bio

Andrew T. Scull (born 1947) is a British-born sociologist whose research is centered on the social history of medicine and particularly psychiatry. He is a Distinguished Professor of Sociology and Science Studies at University of California, San Diego and recipient of the Roy Porter Medal for lifetime contributions to the history of medicine

^ top