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End of the Alphabet

End of the Alphabet
 

Ruby Yarrow is a 14 year old who lives in a busy, loving, chaotic family with her mum, stepdad, brother and two little stepbrothers. Ruby feels a bit like a doormat - she has to help out in the family a lot while her brother doesn't. He wins lots of prizes at school and she has a... read full description below.

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Quick Reference

ISBN 9781869790707
Barcode 9781869790707
Published 20 February 2009 by Random House
Format Paperback
Alternate Format(s) View All (1 other possible title(s) available)
Author(s) By Beale, Fleur
Availability In stock at publisher; ships 6-12 working days

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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9781869790707
ISBN-10 1869790707
Stock Available
Status In stock at publisher; ships 6-12 working days
Publisher Random House
Imprint Random House New Zealand Ltd
Publication Date 20 February 2009
Publication Country New Zealand New Zealand
Format Paperback
Author(s) By Beale, Fleur
Category Fiction (Child / Teen)
Award Winning
NZ, Maori & Pasifika
Young Adult Fiction Finalists
New Zealand & Related
Number of Pages Not specified
Dimensions Width: 131mm
Height: 199mm
Spine: 16mm
Weight 235g
Interest Age 13+ years
Reading Age 13+ years
NBS Text Young Adult Fiction
ONIX Text Children/juvenile
Dewey Code 823.2
Catalogue Code 44817

Description of this Book

Ruby Yarrow is a 14 year old who lives in a busy, loving, chaotic family with her mum, stepdad, brother and two little stepbrothers. Ruby feels a bit like a doormat - she has to help out in the family a lot while her brother doesn't. He wins lots of prizes at school and she has a learning difficulty and needs a reader/writer to help her in exams. Ruby's surname Yarrow is at the end of the alphabet and when the roll gets called out she's always at the end and she hates it. She feels she's always at the end of the line. Not that she's a misery bag at all. She has great friends and loves clothes, fashion magazines and sewing and she's got a real knack for it. She's very keen to go on the school trip to Brazil and so gets a job to earn the money to go - works in a supermarket for an old grump, learns a bit of Portuguese, meets exchange students, doesn't get to go on the trip but stands up to her parents (gets some backbone) and starts to see herself in a much better light. There's even a bit of romance thrown in. It's about having a dream and aiming for it. But it's not sentimental, it's a great read, very real and it has a lovely upbeat tone.

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Awards, Reviews & Star Ratings

Awards Short-listed for Storylines Notable New Zealand Books: Young Adult Fiction 2010 -- Short-listed for New Zealand Post Children's Book Awards: Senior Fiction 2010

There are no reviews for this title.

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Author's Bio

Fleur Beale is the author of many award-winning books for children and young adults - she has now had more than 40 books published in New Zealand, as well as being published in the United States and England. Beale is the only writer to have twice won the Storylines Gaelyn Gordon Award for a Much-Loved Book:with Slide the Corner in 2007, and I Am Not Esther in 2009. She won the Esther Glen Award for distinguished contribution to children's literature for Juno of Taris in the 2009 LIANZA Children's Book Awards. Fierce September won the YA category in the 2011 NZ Post Children's Book Awards and the LIANZA Young Adult Award in 2011. In 2012 she won the Margaret Mahy Medal for her outstanding contribution to children's writing and in 2015 she was made an Officer of the New Zealand Order of Merit. In 1999, Beale was Dunedin College of Education's Writer in Residence. A former high-school teacher, Beale lives in Wellington. One of Beale's most well-known books is I Am Not Esther, the story of a girl who is sent to live with relatives who are members of a strict religious cult. It's a gripping psychological thriller that won an Honour Award in the 1990 New Zealand Post Children's Book Awards and features in the latest volume of 1001 Books You Must Read Before You Grow Up, produced by UK publisher Quintessence. It was reissued in 2012 and has been in print since first published. Magpies identified it as a novel that 'will have relevance wherever there are attempts to control the minds and emotions of children'. The bulk of Beale's writing is set in the contemporary world. Topics range from boys who fix up an old car to bash around a paddock with, a girl who must take over her father's business until he's well enough to take back the reins, to a story about a 15-year-old boy who is a top kart racer. The New Zealand Listener has called Beale 'one of the most consistently accomplished and versatile writers for teenagers in the country'. A 'strong storyteller' (Trevor Agnew, The Press) who is 'consistently engaging' (Frances Grant, Weekend Herald), Beale is a popular participant in the Writers in School programme, testifying that she is 'in touch with the modern young market' (Northern Advocate). Her entry in The Oxford Companion to New Zealand Literature noted that her characters are 'intensely aware of their difficulties, social troubles and shortcomings', and in so doing she exhibits 'her understanding of teenagers, male and female, and ability to motivate even reluctant readers'. Acclaimed as 'a riveting futuristic story', in the National Library's Services to Schools review,Juno of Tarris was likened to Bernard Beckett's Genesis and the 'classic' The Giver by Lois Lowry. The reviewer concluded: 'it is a brilliant story that completely enthralled me'. The sequel, Fierce September, was named one of The New Zealand Listener's '50 Best Children's Books of 2010', and North and South praised its narrative for its 'compelling authenticity', while the Otago Daily Times wrote: 'The writing is tight; the characterisation credible, and the narrative exciting.' The book's innovative technique of opening each chapter with a blog commentary on events was widely acclaimed, the reviewer in Magpies commenting that the 'cross-media technique of combining online blogs with traditional text ... brings the book vividly into our world'. Reviewing The Heart of Danger, the concluding volume in the Juno trilogy, in New Zealand Books, Angelina Sbroma identified Juno as a 'protagonist of wish-fulfilment fantasy in the grand tradition', but for all that is still a 'rounded character'. The book left Bob Docherty requesting a fourth volume.

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