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Abdelhalim Ibrahim Abdelhalim: An Architecture of Collective Memory

Abdelhalim Ibrahim Abdelhalim: An Architecture of Collective Memory
 

Since 1945, the globalization of education and the professionalization of architects and engineers, as well as the conceptualization and production of space, can be seen as a product of battles of legitimacy that were played out in the context of the Cold War and what followed. I... read full description below.

Available for pre-order internationally. Ships upon its international release date of 15 Nov 2019.

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ISBN 9789774168901
Barcode 9789774168901
Published 1 September 2019 by Misc - United Book Distributor
Format Hardback
Author(s) By Steele, James
Availability Available for pre-order, ships once internationally released 15 Nov 2019

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Full details for this title

ISBN-13 9789774168901
ISBN-10 9774168909
Stock Available
Status Available for pre-order, ships once internationally released 15 Nov 2019
Publisher Misc - United Book Distributor
Imprint The American University in Cairo Press
Publication Date 1 September 2019
Publication Country Egypt Egypt
Format Hardback
Author(s) By Steele, James
Category History of Art
Art Styles: C 1960 -
Architecture
Individual Architects
Number of Pages 216
Dimensions Width: 210mm
Height: 280mm
Weight Not specified - defaults to 1,000g
Interest Age General Audience
Reading Age General Audience
NBS Text Architecture
ONIX Text General/trade
Dewey Code Not specified
Catalogue Code 987524

Description of this Book

Since 1945, the globalization of education and the professionalization of architects and engineers, as well as the conceptualization and production of space, can be seen as a product of battles of legitimacy that were played out in the context of the Cold War and what followed. In this book James Steele provides an informative and compelling analysis of one of Egypt's foremost contemporary architects, Abdelhalim Ibrahim Abdelhalim, and his work during a period of Egypt's attempts at constructing an identity and cultural legitimacy within the post-Second World War world order. Born in 1941 in the small town of Sornaga just south of Cairo, Abdelhalim received his architectural training in Egypt and the United States, and is the designer of over one hundred cultural, institutional, and rehabilitation projects, including the Cultural Park for Children in Cairo, the American University in Cairo campus in New Cairo, the Egyptian Embassy in Amman, and the Uthman Ibn Affan Mosque in Qatar. The first comprehensive study of the work and career of Abdelhalim and his office, the Community Design Collaborative (CDC), which he established in Cairo in 1978, Abdelhalim Ibrahim Abdelhalim: An Architecture of Collective Memory is inspired by Abdelhalim's deep belief in the power of rituals as a guiding force behind various human behaviors and the spaces in which they are enacted and designed to play out. Each chapter is consequently dedicated to one of these rituals and the ways in which some of Abdelhalim's primary commissions have, at all levels of scale, revealed and expressed that ritual. In the sequence presented these are: the rituals of possession, reverence, order, the transmission of knowledge, procession, human institutions, geometry, light, the sense of place, materiality, and finally, the ritual of color.

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Author's Bio

James Steele is professor in the School of Architecture, University of Southern California, where he has taught courses on the history and theory of architecture and on design. Prior to that he held a teaching position for ten years at the King Faisal (now Dammam) University near Dhahran in Saudi Arabia. He is the author of over 50 books, including An Architecture for People: The Complete Works of Hassan Fathy, Turkey: A Traveller's Historical and Architectural Guide, and Contemporary Japanese Architecture: Tracing the Next Generation.

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